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People In America Are Spitting On, Abusing, And Attacking Asian Americans Amid Coronavirus

People In America Are Spitting On, Abusing, And Attacking Asian Americans Amid Coronavirus

Such attacks have resulted in Asian-Americans across the country to fear even going out for grocery shopping, taking public transport, or even letting their children go out to play.

President Trump has been referring to the coronavirus as the "Chinese virus" in press conferences. Even as a reporter objected and told him that he would be putting the Asian-Americans at risk because of his comments, the president blatantly disregarded him. According to Forbes,  public health aides, as well as the WHO, had advised Trump to refrain from calling it "Chinese virus" as it could lead to the stigmatization of the Asian-American population in America. And they were right. Reports have been coming in about multiple xenophobic attacks on the Asian-Americans. The president has stopped using the term to describe the virus, but the damage has already been done. 



 

 

Asian-Americans have been fearing for their safety, as people have been spewing hate towards them. According to a report by The New York Times, Chinese-Americans are being spat on and yelled at. Yuanyuan Zhu has been a victim of one such incident. Earlier this month, when Zhu was on her way to the gym she was the target of one man's expletives. Even as she tried to keep her distance from the man, whom she described as someone who "didn’t look strange or angry," he yelled for a bus to "run them[Chinese] over" and even spat on Zhu. The 26-year-old moved to the US from China five years ago.



 

 

Frank Shyong wrote for the LA Times, describing the physical harm and the economic damage the Asian communities have been facing ever since the pandemic broke. "I called community leaders in Chinatown. Many Asian enclaves, like Chinatown, house large, low-income senior populations who are language-isolated — people who are most vulnerable to COVID-19 but least equipped to weather it," he wrote. Much of the important and official information about the virus has not been translated into the dialects spoken by the seniors in these regions. “If they order us to shut down, there’s nothing we can do,” Andy Lam, part-owner of Alice’s Kitchen said. “I can’t even tell you how long we will last.”



 

 

Khinn Muy Ung, 52, lost her job and cannot afford to live in her apartment or buy food anymore. “I just pray to God. Just let us live,” she said. “Let us have peace. I don’t understand what’s going on.” Ung was followed by a man as she was jogging in the park who shouted at her and blamed her for bringing the virus to America. Such attacks have resulted in Asian-Americans across the country to fear even going out for grocery shopping, taking public transport, or even letting their children go out. “If they keep using these terms, the kids are going to pick it up,” Tony Du, an epidemiologist in Howard County, who fears for his son, Larry, told NYT. “They are going to call my 8-year-old son a Chinese virus. It’s serious.”



 

 

Last month, a 16-year-old Asian American high school student was attacked when he was accused of having the virus. The student who has not been identified was taken to the hospital emergency room where they ensured he did not have a concussion or any other serious injuries. L.A. County Supervisor Hilda Solis at the press conference said, "I am concerned because, as someone who is also of immigrant background, I know what it means to face discrimination and racial profiling. And when I heard of the recent incident of a young child being bullied and actually was assaulted because he was pointed out as being of Asian background — and children, unfortunately, repeat things that are said by other people, including their own parents, so we need to put a stop to that." According to People, she even condemned the bullies’ actions.



 

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